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Jumping into the water

Mentally I am already in Israel when I call up the taxi company to reserve a taxi in advance from the airport to Jerusalem. I dial an Israeli number over WhatsApp and immediately hear people screaming in Hebrew in the background. I know I have reached the right place. I explain what I am looking for in Hebrew and he tells me to wait on the line. I expect nice elevator music, but I'm spoiled. Instead I get to listen to the tumult in the office. Someone asks where her cab is. Someone asks is a driver is free. Someone asks how much that would cost. I am feeling a little scared, but I quickly understand that everything is okay. That was my first impression of Israeli culture since I've been there for a visit with my best friend more than two years ago. Did I miss it? To be honest, yes. It's life. Am Israel Chai! 

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